In a world where infusion can be intimidating…MPP Infusion releases new video

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“Welcome to the infusion centers.”  With those calming, opening words, MPP Infusion’s new video shows potential and current patients all about the process of infusing at MPP Infusion centers.

The updated video was recently posted to MPPInfusion.com.  It shows the process of a patient entering an infusion center, receiving a check up, getting set up in a heated chair with WI-FI, and starting the infusion process.

The video also lists the drugs they infuse and the overall benefits of an infusion center compared to a hospital.  In addition, the video features Senior Director of Infusion Operations Lisa Yoakum discussing financial alternatives for infusion patients.

MPP-Infusion-video-2016_02_story“I’d feel comfortable sending a loved one of mine to one of our centers specifically because their comfort is job one.  I believe our company is built for that purpose,” said Senior Director of Infusion Josh Smith in the video.

Watch the updated 4 minute video about MPP Infusion


Ceceilia Gee appointed to expert panel for Infusion RN certification

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She considers it her retirement job, but that doesn’t mean that Infusion Center of Denver Clinic Coordinator Ceceilia Gee is letting her infusion skills stagnate.  Last year she earned her Certified Registered Nurse Infusion (CRNI) accreditation and was chosen to be on the 2016 CRNI expert panel to help shape the certification exam for future infusion nurses. Editor’s note: Infusion Center of Denver is owned by MPP Infusion, a Renal Ventures Management company.

Cecelia-Gee_CRNI-cert-expert_storyThe CRNI certification is offered by the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation (INCC), which was established in 1983 to develop a credentialing program that increases positive patient outcomes and enhances the specialty of infusion nursing.  INCC’s CRNI certification is the only nationally recognized and accredited certification in infusion nursing.

“The CRNI certification test is tough.  I took it twice and missed it by two points the first time,” said Gee. “It’s designed to cover all aspects of infusion from biologics to hemotology-oncology and have a pass rate of about 60% [of test takers].”

To help confirm that the test is up-to-date and the questions are difficult enough to ensure a base competency level amongst test takers, INCC convenes an expert panel of 15 infusion nurses every five years.  Gee volunteered for the current panel because INCC wanted nurses from all infusion therapy environments.

The panel evaluates the difficulty of the questions, but Gee wanted to do more than that. “With biologic infusion growing at such a rapid pace, I’m encouraging them to have more questions with that content on the CRNI exam,” said Gee.

The panel evaluates each question based on how many people they think will get the question right.  If the percentage of people who get it right is significantly different from how many people the panel think will get it right, the question is reevaluated and possibly changed.  The exam consists of 170 questions administered over three hours and covers core content areas of infusion nursing and the INCC Role Delineation Study.

CRNI_HEADER_storyOver the past three years 663 candidates have passed the exam with a total of 3,400 infusion nurses earning the CRNI accreditation since its inception.

“I see the CRNI certification program continuing to grow as more medicines become infusibles and more facilities like the Infusion Center of Denver open their doors and treat patients.  I encourage all infusion nurses to earn the CRNI certification,” said Gee.

The next CRNI exam is scheduled for March 2016.

– To learn more about INCC and the CRNI certification, visit their web site at http://incc1.org.